Archive for the 'Squash' Category

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Why I love squash – high speed, slow motion video

Now that high-speed, super-slow motion technology has finally caught up to capture the lightning quick speed, super-human athleticism, thrilling drama and excitement of this beautiful sport, how could the world not fall in love with it? How can it NOT be in the Olympics?!?!

CLICK HERE TO VOTE FOR SQUASH TO BE INCLUDED IN THE 2020 OLYMPICS

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Squash still in the bid for the 2020 Olympics

ALERT!

Squash is falling behind wrestling in the poll of which sports should be included in the Olympics 2020 in “Inside The Games”, which is widely read by IOC members. So your help in voting and emailing/tweeting all contacts at your disposal and asking them to vote for squash at the following website would be greatly appreciated and very helpful to getting squash in the 2020 Olympics:

http://www.insidethegames.biz/polls/71-which-sport-do-you-think-the-ioc-should-vote-to-include-on-the-olympic-programme-for-2020

Squash 2020 – Back the Bid! Follow on twitter @vote4squash

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Squash Olympic Bid

Squash Olympic Bid for 2020

Help squash make it into the Olympics -
FORWARD this link to friends, family and colleagues
who are sport enthusiasts!

 

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Squash in the 2020 Olympics

Roger Federer Back The Bid To Get Squash In The Olympics

Roger Federer Back The Bid To Get Squash In The Olympics

You may or may not know that squash is vying for a coveted place in the Olympics with its Back The Bid campaign to get into the 2020 Olympics. The Professional Squash Association sent out the following message to all players and it would be great if you could help out with the campaign today.

Just take 5 minutes to help make history and get squash into the Olympics!

Even Roger Federer backs the bid because he knows that squash should have been in the Olympics a long, long time ago.

Dear Players,

Re: Squash 2020 Olympic Campaign

I’m writing to you in my capacity as CEO of the PSA. As you may know, there have been some recent developments regarding Squash’s bid for Olympic inclusion in 2020.

Wrestling is no longer a core Olympic sport, and it joins Squash along with 6 others sports competing for election to the 2020 Olympic Games Sports Programme.  Squash has a crucial presentation to the International Olympic Committee Executive Board at the end of May and a decision will be made in September on the sport to be added to the 2020 Games.

So the next six months or so are critical to our Olympic ambitions and your support is paramount.

Vero Communications, the company advising our Bid, has given us some ideas on how we can help build support for the bid and from our end I hope you will join me in my enthusiasm to get Squash included in the Olympic Games.

We want to create a push on Twitter via @vote4squash and the hash tag #Vote4Squash and through FaceBook status updates by all the key players on tour.  This will help give a quick and potentially significant boost to the bid via your social media following.

With this in mind I have a proposal for all of you:

Send out a Tweet asking people to follow @vote4squash and to include the hash tag #Vote4Squash on Tuesday 19th February at roughly noon UK time – this will help the trending of the hashtag as it is morning in USA, early afternoon in Europe and evening in Asia/Australia.

Essentially, we want followers of @vote4squash to dramatically increase and for #vote4squash to trend on Twitter.

So ensure your followers have #Vote4Squash in their Tweets, that they follow @vote4squash  and add comments about Squash’s bid e.g. – ‘I’m backing the Bid, are you? Show your support via #Vote4Squash. If not, why not? #Vote4Squash.’

If you are not on Twitter, you can help on Facebook by posting #Vote4Squash in your status – hopefully your Facebook fans and followers will then promote it on Twitter.

WSA fully support this idea also, so if we co-ordinate our efforts and send out a united message to the wider public, International Olympic Committee and media, it will certainly help our campaign and demonstrate the global support for Squash to join the Olympic Games.

Thanks for your support.

Regards
Alex Gough
CEO PSA

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World Squash Day

World Squash Day, 2020 Olympic Bid, You can do your bit to get squash into the 2020 Olympics by joining the worldwide initiative Back The Bid… The best way is to go to your local squash club tomorrow – October 20th and participation in what will become a World Record event… World Squash Day.

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Choking In Sport

Choking is one of those taboo words athletes shun at any cost.

There are a lot of theories and suppositions about the source or cause of choking.

I recently came across this video used by a US squash coach to explain to his team that choking is NOT in your genes – UNLESS you’re a goat.

What I liked about this is that it’s a visual cue you can use to prevent choking whenever you’re feeling stressed or under pressure – just remember… YOU’RE NOT A GOAT!

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Lessons from a champion

Mindset Of A Champion, Jahangir Khan, Squash Book, Rahmat Khan, Squash CoachingI recently visited a bookstore in Broadbeach on the Gold Coast (Australia), which has a great collection of used books, and found the ultimate squash classic by World Champion Jahangir Khan aptly named Winning Squash.

Once you’ve mastered the basic strokes and court movement principles, as an elite squash player, you need to get into “A Champion Mindset” as often as you can.

What I picked up from Winning Squash was Jahangir’s reliance on his cousin Rahmat Khan’s coaching skills and abilities. As a top squash player, reaching world #12 and a Khan, he understood and appreciated what it takes to be a champion.

Without a mentor, coach, friend and advisor, there is no doubt in my mind (or Jahangir’s) that his achievements would have been much less prolific than they were.

The key for any aspiring athlete is to get multiple points of view and then choose ONE that works. Listen, obey and respect that ONE voice. That ONE direction. That one FORCE.

Otherwise what happens is you get splintered into multiple, divergent directions and lose momentum and confidence. Confidence makes a big difference in a quick-response sport like squash. With mere fractions of a second to choose a shot (or return), the brain needs to feel it’s capable of pushing the envelope to select the best shot to make, instantly calculating the risk/reward ratios involved.

The second and almost as important revelation was Jahangir’s training regimen and mental focus. I expected this from the all-time-best squash player, but what I found interesting was how much of it was ‘trusting the coaching process’.

Even back then (the book was published in 1985), Jahangir noticed that young players had difficulty succumbing to authority (elders, teachers and coaches). I can attest to that with adults of all ages. There is something inherently arrogant with athletes who think “they know it all” even though they continue to languish in the “B” leagues.

Being coachable is a trait all champions possess. They recognise the need to have an outside perspective that focuses on them from a much more objective viewpoint with a set of skills designed and developed to extract the best from them.

You can’t be ON the court AND watch the game at the same time. Each has a role and responsibility to the process of creating and sustaining excellence. Today’s elite athlete has to invest in the best technology and training which now includes psychological training well beyond the traditional visualisation and pre-match preparation techniques.

Winning Squash is a classic – it captured the essence of the Champion Of All Champions – Jahangir Khan – at his apex of achievement.

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Intensity: How Much is Enough? Too Much?

In peak training phases, Michael Phelps will swim at least 80,000 meters a week, nearly 50 miles. That includes two practices a day, sometimes three when he was training at altitude.

All elite athletes face the dilemma: How much is enough versus too much?

Most athletes however it’s a case of too little and too infrequently.

Too often, there is a reluctance to going full-on with training when it’s the fastest and usually the safest way to create breakthroughs.

Intensity, Focus, Drive, Determination, Sports Psychology, Champion Mindset, Mindset Of A Champion

The challenge is knowing WHAT to do to push yourself beyond your current limits into a new realm of possibility. Unless you “up” the intensity, you’re simply not going to get those all-important quantum leaps you want.

Depending on your sport and level of proficiency, intensity can means doubling your on-court time, doubling or tripling your running or swimming distance, increasing your gym visits, yoga or aerobics classes to 2/day instead of 3/week…

You are the best judge of what ‘intensity’ means to you – one thing is for sure, you need to go beyond your comfort zone – ideally to total exhaustion (without injury or pain) or as close to it as you can.

What you’ll quickly realise is that you’re capable of much more than you’re currently doing.

What set Michael Phelps apart from all other swimmers is that he aimed to become the best swimmer HE could become.

Michael Phelps and his coach NEVER set any limits. His autobiographical book’s title reveals his and his coach’s mindset “No Limits“.

My message to you today is simple and straightforward – what limits have you placed on your training or playing?

What time limits?

What frequency limits?

What intensity limits?

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Get to it somehow and hammer it somewhere

Every once in a while someone comes up with a saying that encapsulates what you need to be doing – succinctly and elegantly.

Today’s blog post is short and sweet – for racket sport athletes as Chester Barnes, a table tennis champion said “get to it somehow and hammer it somewhere!

Champion Mindset, Mindset Of A Champion, Sports Psychology

There are two parts to this – Doing whatever it takes to get to the ball and then doing something with it.

Easier said than done!

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Lessons from a champion

Mindset Of A Champion, Jahangir Khan, Squash Book, Rahmat Khan, Squash CoachingI recently visited a bookstore in Broadbeach on the Gold Coast (Australia), which has a great collection of used books, and found the ultimate squash classic by World Champion Jahangir Khan aptly named Winning Squash.

Once you’ve mastered the basic strokes and court movement principles, as an elite squash player, you need to get into “A Champion Mindset” as often as you can.

What I picked up from Winning Squash was Jahangir’s reliance on his cousin Rahmat Khan’s coaching skills and abilities. As a top squash player, reaching world #12 and a Khan, he understood and appreciated what it takes to be a champion.

Without a mentor, coach, friend and advisor, there is no doubt in my mind (or Jahangir’s) that his achievements would have been much less prolific than they were.

The key for any aspiring athlete is to get multiple points of view and then choose ONE that works. Listen, obey and respect that ONE voice. That ONE direction. That one FORCE.

Otherwise what happens is you get splintered into multiple, divergent directions and lose momentum and confidence. Confidence makes a big difference in a quick-response sport like squash. With mere fractions of a second to choose a shot (or return), the brain needs to feel it’s capable of pushing the envelope to select the best shot to make, instantly calculating the risk/reward ratios involved.

The second and almost as important revelation was Jahangir’s training regimen and mental focus. I expected this from the all-time-best squash player, but what I found interesting was how much of it was ‘trusting the coaching process’.

Even back then (the book was published in 1985), Jahangir noticed that young players had difficulty succumbing to authority (elders, teachers and coaches). I can attest to that with adults of all ages. There is something inherently arrogant with athletes who think “they know it all” even though they continue to languish in the “B” leagues.

Being coachable is a trait all champions possess. They recognise the need to have an outside perspective that focuses on them from a much more objective viewpoint with a set of skills designed and developed to extract the best from them.

You can’t be ON the court AND watch the game at the same time. Each has a role and responsibility to the process of creating and sustaining excellence. Today’s elite athlete has to invest in the best technology and training which now includes psychological training well beyond the traditional visualisation and pre-match preparation techniques.

Winning Squash is a classic – it captured the essence of the Champion Of All Champions – Jahangir Khan – at his apex of achievement.

For more outstanding books on the Champion’s Mindset and sport psychology books, click on the hyperlinks.

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